Europe, Poland, Silesia, Wroclaw, Zbigniew Halat Photography
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Śląska Panna Olimpia, lat 20. Silesian Maiden Olympia, age 20. "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it", "Ci, którzy nie pamiętają przeszłości, skazani są na jej powtarzanie", "Wer sich nicht seiner Vergangenheit erinnert, ist verurteilt, sie zu wiederholen", "Кто не в состоянии запомнить прошлое, обречены на то, чтобы пережить его вновь", "Той, хто забуває минуле, приречений його повторювати", George Santayana Джордж Сантаяна  Fine Art Photography by Zbigniew Halat
Śląska Panna Olimpia, lat 20. Silesian Maiden Olympia, age 20. "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it", "Ci, którzy nie pamiętają przeszłości, skazani są na jej powtarzanie", "Wer sich nicht seiner Vergangenheit erinnert, ist verurteilt, sie zu wiederholen", "Кто не в состоянии запомнить прошлое, обречены на то, чтобы пережить его вновь", "Той, хто забуває минуле, приречений його повторювати", George Santayana Джордж Сантаяна

The idyllic view of Peter Wlastowic Boulevard on the Sand Island (Wyspa Piaskowa, Piasek) tells a concise history of Wroclaw, Poland. Peter Wlastowic, the heir of the Swans clan of the West Slavic indigenous tribe of Slezans, belonging to the Lechitic / Polish group which evolved from the Lusatian culture (existed in the later Bronze Age and early Iron Age, 1300 Before Christ – 500 Before Christ), was a founder of the Romanesque church from before 1148 (1133?), rebuilt many times later.  After AD 1050 the church was given to the Canons Regular of St. Augustine. Attached to the church, is a cloister building of the Augustinian monastery at Piasek. Not too late after the seizure of Silesia by Prussia under Frederick II in 1741, Frederick William III in 1810 ordered to expropriate and plunder all monasteries and Catholic Church foundations. In the building of Augustinian monastery at Piasek, the University Library got located. Within these walls, remainings of rich book collections and archives from many pillaged monasteries in Silesia were stored. The last day of Prussian occupation of the city was May 6, 1945, when the German authorities of Wroclaw left basement of the University Library for Villa Colonia to surrender Festung Breslau (Strongold of Wroclaw) to the Red Army.
The idyllic view of Peter Wlastowic Boulevard on the Sand Island (Wyspa Piaskowa, Piasek) tells a concise history of Wroclaw, Poland. Peter Wlastowic, the heir of the Swans clan of the West Slavic indigenous tribe of Slezans, belonging to the Lechitic / Polish group which evolved from the Lusatian culture (existed in the later Bronze Age and early Iron Age, 1300 Before Christ – 500 Before Christ), was a founder of the Romanesque church from before 1148 (1133?), rebuilt many times later.  After AD 1050 the church was given to the Canons Regular of St. Augustine. Attached to the church, is a cloister building of the Augustinian monastery at Piasek. Not too late after the seizure of Silesia by Prussia under Frederick II in 1741, Frederick William III in 1810 ordered to expropriate and plunder all monasteries and Catholic Church foundations. In the building of Augustinian monastery at Piasek, the University Library got located. Within these walls, remainings of rich book collections and archives from many pillaged monasteries in Silesia were stored. The last day of Prussian occupation of the city was May 6, 1945, when the German authorities of Wroclaw left basement of the University Library for Villa Colonia to surrender Festung Breslau (Strongold of Wroclaw) to the Red Army.

In The Most Holy Virgin Mary on the Sand Roman Catholic Church, above the entrance to the sacristy, is the foundation tympanum, AD 1150-1160, known as Sedes Sapientiae Wratislaviensis (The Wroclaw Throne of Wisdom) commemorating the religious foundation of Peter Wlastowic, and depicting Peter's widow Maria and and their son Swetoslaw offering a model church to Enthroned Madonna with the Infant Jesus. Maria was daughter of the Great Prince of Kiev, great-granddaughter of St Vladimir the Great, the Baptiser of Rus. Prince Jaxa, duke of Kopanica (now Koepenik, borough of Berlin) who represented native West Slavic population beween Laba (the Elbe) and Odra (the Oder) rivers, was married to Agathya,  daughter of Peter and Maria. Nowadays Wroclaw is the world's northernmost big city cultivating a vivid culture of the Roman Catholic Faith, and he world's westernmost big city (not being a national capital) growing a vibrant Slavic culture.
In The Most Holy Virgin Mary on the Sand Roman Catholic Church, above the entrance to the sacristy, is the foundation tympanum, AD 1150-1160, known as Sedes Sapientiae Wratislaviensis (The Wroclaw Throne of Wisdom) commemorating the religious foundation of Peter Wlastowic, and depicting Peter's widow Maria and and their son Swetoslaw offering a model church to Enthroned Madonna with the Infant Jesus. Maria was daughter of the Great Prince of Kiev, great-granddaughter of St Vladimir the Great, the Baptiser of Rus. Prince Jaxa, duke of Kopanica (now Koepenik, borough of Berlin) who represented the native West Slavic population between Laba (the Elbe) and Odra (the Oder) rivers, was married to Agathya,  daughter of Peter and Maria. Nowadays Wroclaw is the world's northernmost big city cultivating a vivid culture of the Roman Catholic Faith, and he world's westernmost big city (not being a national capital) growing a vibrant Slavic culture.
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Europe, Poland, Silesia, Wroclaw, Zbigniew Halat Photography Europa, Polska, Śląsk, Wrocław, Fotografia Zbigniewa Hałata